I hope you have seen the latest IaaS Gartner quadrant (https://www.gartner.com/doc/reprints?id=1-2G2O5FC&ct=150519&st=sb). AWS continues to be the leader with Azure in the second place. Apart from the categorization into leaders, visionaries, niche players and challengers, there is an interesting section called “Recommended Mode”. This section instructs organizations on how best to utilize the public cloud infrastructure.

In most organizations, IT typically operates into Bi Modal or two modes:

Mode 1 – Traditional IT

This is used for traditional applications. Infrastructure used in these scenarios is not expected to change often and comes with stringent needs on security, availability etc., typical of any Enterprise application. Mode 1 will typically be used by the CIO organizations.

Mode 2 – Agile IT

Mode 2 is for dynamic infrastructure and expected to be used by the Engineering, Development or other Business Units.

When Virtualization took hold, most traditional applications migrated to the Virtualized infrastructure. But, since most of these infrastructure didn’t change with time, there was no urgent need to move to a Cloud based infrastructure. This, I would say, is one of the reasons for low adoption of the Private Cloud.

However, an interesting shift seems to be happening with the Public Cloud – primarily AWS and Azure. With the Public clouds meeting the enterprise requirements on security, availability etc., the CIOs are more open to moving their traditional / proprietary applications to the Public Cloud. This is the primary reason for Public Cloud adoption and not any of the cloud features, such as scalability and flexibility.

In the report, Gartner notes that both AWS and Azure can be used for both Mode 1 and Mode 2.

With Mode 1 being the largest part of the IT infrastructure in any organization, we are beginning to see the large IT transformation projects. One of the factors triggering these projects is the hardware refresh cycle at these organizations.

There is no doubt that the ultimate winners will be the Public Cloud vendors, and the ones who will start losing are the hardware vendors.

75% growth on a y-o-y basis for the Public Clouds doesn’t seem to be coming down anytime soon !!!

Do you think otherwise? Eager to hear your thoughts.